Thinkfood & Thunkgarbage

prokopetz:

grrspit:

nessanotarized:

nativefemboy:

thartist72:

“In 2002, having spent more than three years in one residence for the first time in my life, I got called for jury duty. I show up on time, ready to serve. When we get to the voir dire, the lawyer says to me, “I see you’re an astrophysicist. What’s that?” I answer, “Astrophysics is the laws of physics, applied to the universe—the Big Bang, black holes, that sort of thing.” Then he asks, “What do you teach at Princeton?” and I say, “I teach a class on the evaluation of evidence and the relative unreliability of eyewitness testimony.” Five minutes later, I’m on the street. A few years later, jury duty again. The judge states that the defendant is charged with possession of 1,700 milligrams of cocaine. It was found on his body, he was arrested, and he is now on trial. This time, after the Q&A is over, the judge asks us whether there are any questions we’d like to ask the court, and I say, “Yes, Your Honor. Why did you say he was in possession of 1,700 milligrams of cocaine? That equals 1.7 grams. The ‘thousand’ cancels with the ‘milli-’ and you get 1.7 grams, which is less than the weight of a dime.” Again I’m out on the street.”

powerful Black Science Man

Exactly.

“I teach a class on the evaluation of evidence and the relative unreliability of eyewitness testimony.” Five minutes later, I’m on the street.
This is a good illustration of what’s wrong with the US criminal justice system.

I’m more struck by the second anecdote, in which he was evidently disqualified from jury duty for displaying the ability to do math.

prokopetz:

grrspit:

nessanotarized:

nativefemboy:

thartist72:

“In 2002, having spent more than three years in one residence for the first time in my life, I got called for jury duty. I show up on time, ready to serve. When we get to the voir dire, the lawyer says to me, “I see you’re an astrophysicist. What’s that?” I answer, “Astrophysics is the laws of physics, applied to the universe—the Big Bang, black holes, that sort of thing.” Then he asks, “What do you teach at Princeton?” and I say, “I teach a class on the evaluation of evidence and the relative unreliability of eyewitness testimony.” Five minutes later, I’m on the street.

A few years later, jury duty again. The judge states that the defendant is charged with possession of 1,700 milligrams of cocaine. It was found on his body, he was arrested, and he is now on trial. This time, after the Q&A is over, the judge asks us whether there are any questions we’d like to ask the court, and I say, “Yes, Your Honor. Why did you say he was in possession of 1,700 milligrams of cocaine? That equals 1.7 grams. The ‘thousand’ cancels with the ‘milli-’ and you get 1.7 grams, which is less than the weight of a dime.” Again I’m out on the street.”

powerful Black Science Man

Exactly.

“I teach a class on the evaluation of evidence and the relative unreliability of eyewitness testimony.” Five minutes later, I’m on the street.

This is a good illustration of what’s wrong with the US criminal justice system.

I’m more struck by the second anecdote, in which he was evidently disqualified from jury duty for displaying the ability to do math.

(via remylaforgewilbury)

todayinhistory:

August 22nd 565: First sighting of the ‘Loch Ness Monster’
On this day in 565 AD, the first recorded sighting of a ‘monster’ in Loch Ness, Scotland, was made by St. Columba. The Irish monk and Christian missionary supposedly saw the ‘beast’ attack a man in the water. His story was written in the 7th Century by Adomnán in the ‘Life of St. Columba’. Whilst many attribute this story to typical legends of the time, believers in the ‘Loch Ness Monster’ claim this as the first sighting of the creature.

todayinhistory:

August 22nd 565: First sighting of the ‘Loch Ness Monster’

On this day in 565 AD, the first recorded sighting of a ‘monster’ in Loch Ness, Scotland, was made by St. Columba. The Irish monk and Christian missionary supposedly saw the ‘beast’ attack a man in the water. His story was written in the 7th Century by Adomnán in the ‘Life of St. Columba’. Whilst many attribute this story to typical legends of the time, believers in the ‘Loch Ness Monster’ claim this as the first sighting of the creature.

(via remylaforgewilbury)

brudesworld:

"We have fed our sea for a thousand years, and she calls us, still unfed.  Though there’s never a wave of all her waves, but marks our English dead."
Illustration by William Heath Robinson from Rudyard Kipling’s A Song of the English, 1909

brudesworld:

"We have fed our sea for a thousand years, and she calls us, still unfed.  Though there’s never a wave of all her waves, but marks our English dead."

Illustration by William Heath Robinson from Rudyard Kipling’s A Song of the English, 1909

(Source: dmichaelmay.wordpress.com, via remylaforgewilbury)